Alyssa Frystak

UIC Arch | SAIC MSHP '19. Old building junkie. Crazy cat lady. Former professional ballet dancer. Expert napper.

550 posts 241 followers 869 following

Bummed we could only do one day of #ohc2017 this year (because, 🙄 grad school), but still had a great time yesterday. #ohc2014 was our first date and every year we’ve made it part of our anniversary tradition. If you’re in Chicago, make sure to take advantage of this awesome 2-day architecture festival to get out and explore your city!!!

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This is quickly becoming the year of the mega church #research #ohc2017

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Stan Mansion, Moritz F. Straugh, 1928.

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Adaptive reuse ⛪️=🎪 #ohc2017

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Torrential downpour stopped us from taking a picture of the outside of this beautiful historic church. Quite possible it got stuck by ⚡️ lightning while we were in it too 🙀 #ohc2017

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Inclusive #ohc2017

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The Federal Historic Tax Credit can be used on so many different types of projects, but it is currently on the chopping block as part of this administration’s tax reform plan. Let your Congressman, especially those on the Ways & Means committee (Peter Roskam) know that you want to see the HTC kept in place. If not for this federal level tax incentive we wouldn’t have the new Revival Food Hall (picture 1), The Old Colony (picture2&3), or the Kimpton Gray Hotel (picture4).

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Story of my life.

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Started the documentation process for this amazing building today. Guaranteed to be another set of stellar drawings. (Building–Loebl, Schlossman and Bennett; stained glass–Abraham Rattner.)

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Carlson Cottage (Lincoln Park Comfort Station), Joseph Lyman Silsbee, 1888.

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In honor of #worldballetday, I present my former life (sorry for the poor image quality, this was a time before screenshots and retina displays 😬)

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Wishing a very happy birthday to one of my oldest and dearest friends. Can't imagine going through all of life's ups and downs without you. Love you Kase!

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Fall farmer's market haul #pumpkinsonastick

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1836 & 1838 N. Lincoln Park West, Old Town Triangle. Homes of Charles and Fred Wacker, prominent Chicago brewers, for whom Wacker Drive is named. .
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(So stinking cute.)

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Little babies 🍓

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Morning commute views could be worse #SAIC #artinstitute

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Writing architectural description is hard. It's even harder when your cat is just staring at you like a creep. .
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#catsofinstagram @sophie_the_city_kitty

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These two are getting married!!! 💍❤️💃🏼

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My Friday view for the rest of the semester 🏙 #mycity #chicago #northlawndale #saic

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Missing my favorite reading spot, but missing the 24 hr room service most 😋 #takemeback #beachreads #biglittlelies

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In the wake of such turmoil regarding monuments in the U.S., I think it's important to look to other countries for examples of how they deal with painful (or shameful) periods in their past. Diversifying the voices that write the narrative can be one way of shifting our understanding of an event, place, or person, leading to a more truthful and honest conversation about our collective history. Thank you @sitesofconscience for demonstrating how powerful language can be. •
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#Repost @sitesofconscience
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In the aftermath of Charlottesville, this plaque offers one model of how societies can approach difficult histories. After an apartheid-era plaque marking a contentious hedge was defaced in South Africa in 2001, a new one was written through community consultation. The site remains, but the new plaque adds information about the site’s colonial underpinnings and the fact that it is for many a symbol of pain and exclusion. The language featured on both plaques is below.
#SitesOfConscience #Charlottesville
Original Plaque:

This hedge of wild almonds was planted in the year 1660 AD by order of Commander Jan van Riebeeck to mark the southern frontier of the Cape Colony, from Kirstenbosch along Wynberg Hill, to a point below the Hen and Chickens Rocks. Thence the hedge was continued by a fence of poles across the camp ground to the mouth of the Salt River.

Plaque Written after Community Consultation:

This wild almond hedge was planted in 1660 by order of Commander Jan van Riebeeck as a barrier protecting the expanding European population against the Indigenous Koisan inhabitants of the Cape. The barrier stretched from Kirstenbosch along Wynberg Hill to a point below the Hen and Chickens rocks. Beyond this the barrier continued as a pole fence to the mouth of the Salt River. The hedge has come to be a symbol of exclusion.

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Sorry for another cat post, but like, how could I not. #catsinsombreros

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Here's your Sunday moment of zen 🌊

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24 hours till I can boop this nose again 🤗 #cantwait

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My god he's an idiot. But he's my idiot.

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Not letting required reading get in the way of my vacation 💁🏽

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First day breakfast view 👌🏼 #nofilter

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Couldn't have asked for a more perfect day for a beautiful wedding. Congratulations Amanda and Mike! Cheers to many years of happiness ❤️ #mandamarriesmike

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Guess I'm not getting any reading done today.

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