Amazon Watch Official

Supporting indigenous peoples. Protecting the Amazon. Join us for a visual journey through the most biodiverse place on the planet!

http://amazonwatch.org/donate

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The trees of the Amazon rainforest are powerful and beautiful, and provide a crucial role in maintaining the balance of the region's - and the globe's - climate.

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On the 10th anniversary of #UNDRIP, we celebrate the progress made and call to mind the work left to be done to truly achieve full respect for #indigenousrights.
In this photo, indigenous peoples from around Brazil rally at Rio’s Flamengo Beach in 2012. They gather d there during the Rio +20 summit to promote the importance of free-running rivers, truly clean energy sources like solar power and including indigenous knowledge as part of the solution to climate issues. The activity was led by Brazil’s many indigenous peoples organized under the umbrella of the Articulation of Brazilian Indigenous Peoples.
Photo by @carobennett

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The Amazon River and its tributaries provide for transport, food, drinking, bathing, and recreation needs of indigenous communities. This Achuar boy had just returned from a fishing trip when this photo was taken, during an Amazon Watch trip to Peru in 2010.

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This delicate orchid was found in Yasuni National Park in the Ecuadorian Amazon by wildlife photographer Bejat McCracken. Isn't the biodiversity of the Amazon incredible?

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For #worldphotoday we wanted to share one of our fav photos of the gorgeous treasure that is the Amazon. ...
This shot was taken in 2014 along the Marañón River, an Amazon River tributary in Peru.

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Brazil's indigenous peoples know well the meaning of the world #resistance. For centuries, they have resisted assaults on their rights and territories, like these indigenous people of the Xingú River basin protested the Belo Monte dam in 2012.
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Today, too, indigenous peoples in Brazil are resisting new attempts to attack their rights and territories, rollbacks led by the country's agribusiness sector and green-lighted by the current president.
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Learn more at amazonwatch.org

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This #indigenousday, Amazon Watch honors our brave indigenous partners who every day defend their rights, land, and our climate. ..
Despite the rain, in 2016 this U'wa woman and hundreds of other U'wa and local communities peacefully occupied a gas plant that the Colombian government installed on U'wa ancestral territory in the cloud forests of the Andean-Amazon border region. ..
Join Amazon Watch as we partner with fierce defenders of land and life like the U'wa: amazonwatch.org/donate
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Photo: Kinorama/Copy Left

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Happy #internationalcatday! This ocelot is from Yasuni National Park in the Ecuadorian Amazon. They and the entire forest are at risk from new oil drilling. #endamazoncrude

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This cutie is a squirrel monkey. Though found throughout the tropical forests of Central and South America, this one was photographed in the Ecuadorian Amazon by @kathleen.vanoppen.
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Squirrel monkeys don't use their tails as a 5th limb like many monkeys from the region, but they do use them like balancing poles. --
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Sápara children walk through the outskirts of their village deep in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Our colleague took this photo during a trip in April with @empoweredbylight, during which we helped the Sápara install solar energy and communications systems to power their resistance to oil drilling in their ancestral territory.

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Gloria Ushigua, a leader of the Sápara people of the Ecuadorian Amazon, speaks before delivering a letter from the Sápara to the Chinese Consulate in San Francisco. The letter demands that state-run oil company Andes Peteoleum cancel plans to drill on Sápara territory. If drilling happens, the Sápara and their rainforest homes face massive destruction.
You can take action solidarity here: http://www.ienearth.org/defend-the-sapara-people/

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This beauty is a male collared tragon. These birds, found in the warmest parts of Central and South America, nest in holes in termite nests or trees, and feed on insects and fruit.
Photo by @kathleen.vanoppen

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In the distance you can see the Achuar village of Kuyuntsa on the Manchari River in the Peruvian Amazon.
The Achuar have been protecting their ancestry territory for millennia, most recently defending it from oil drilling by a Canadian company then known as Talisman. Today, a new company, Geopark, wants to drill on the territory - and the Achuar have pledged to continue to protect their forests and rivers.

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"There's no solution to #ClimateChange that doesn't include protecting the #AmazonRainforest." Our Director Leila Salazar-López explains why your support of Amazon Watch is so critical for the rainforest, its peoples, and the global climate.
We have until June 30 to raise $250,000! Will you join us? https://amazonwatch.org/donate (link also in bio)

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On #worldrefugeeday we honor the indigenous peoples who have been or will be displaced from their homes as the result of industrial development projects on their ancestral territory.
The men pictured are from some of the 18 indigenous ethnicities of the Xingu that participated in a 2011 gathering organized to coordinate resistance to the Belo Monte dam. Now that the dam construction has moved ahead, Xingu peoples are at risk of forced migration due to the irreparable damage being done to the water and forest systems in which they rely for survival.

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The enormous circular leaves of the Amazonian giant water lily (Victoria amazonica), which can reach over 2.5m across, are anchored by long stalks arising from an underground stem buried in the mud of the riverbottom. The leaves first appear as spiny heads but expand rapidly up to half square meter per day. This one was photographed by @kathleen.vanoppen near Manaus, Brazil.

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Many of the birds of the Amazon, like this aracari, are boldly colorful. Like others in the toucan family, aracaris make their nests in tree hollows, and when eggs hatch the young emerge with no down, completely naked.
Photo by Bejat McCracken

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Isn't the Amazon rainforest incredibly beautiful?
Photo by @Kathleen.Vanoppen

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This is Sônia Bone Guajajara, the national coordinator of Brazil's Association of Indigenous Peoples (APIB) and tireless spokeswoman for the country's indigenous movement. She hails from a Guajajara village in the state of Maranhão. Today Sônia regularly confronts her adversaries from Brazil's ruralista agribusiness bloc face-to-face, steadfastly pushing back against their manifold attacks on indigenous rights.
Read more about Sônia's work and the Brazilian government's severe rollbacks on indigenous rights and environmental protections on our website.

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Happy #biodiversityday! We're celebrating by sharing a photo of this wacky creature, a spine-headed katydid, found by photographer Bejat McCracken in Yasuni Park in Ecuador - one of the most biodiverse places on earth.

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The Amazon rainforest is full of Mother Nature's miracles. These trees are called 'walking palms' because they are believed to be able to use their stilt-like roots to move through the first a few centimeters in order to best catch sunlight.

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This is Arnaldo Kaba Munduruku, a leader of the Munduruku of the Tapajós River basin in the Brazilian Amazon.
Like all indigenous peoples in Brazil, as well as the entire Amazon rainforest, Antonio and his people are under serious threat right now. The Brazilian government is waging a campaign to slash the budgets of indigenous and environmental agencies and pass laws that drastically cut land rights and environmental protections.
You can help Antonio, all of Brazil's indigenous peoples, and the Amazon rainforest by signing the petition at amazonwatch.org/landrightsnow

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This little girl is from Sarayaku in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Her prospects for a healthy life in her ancestral territory depend upon her community's ability - supported by allies like Amazon Watch - to continue to defend their territory from the onslaught of oil drilling pushing farther and farther into the Amazon rainforest.

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The trees of the Amazon rainforest are powerful: they are quite literally the lungs of the planet, absorbing carbon dioxide and water and then “breathing" out oxygen and rainfall.
Photo by Bejat McCracken

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Today indigenous peoples from Alaska to the Amazon marched in the #climatemarch to proclaim #indigenousrights = #climatejustice.
Thanks to @leonardodicaprio for his support for our Shipibo and Sapara partners and their call to #endamazoncrude!

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Like we did in 2014, we will march in the #peoplesclimate march this weekend, alongside indigenous partners, friends, and allies. We march because we're all impacted by climate change, but indigenous and frontline communities are hit the hardest, and because we know we must #keepitintheground and guarantee #landrightsnow if we're going to survive the coming #climatecrisis.
If you want to march with us, got to http://amwt.ch/4029 for details.

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This #earthday, protect the Amazon rainforest with us!
If we hope to survive the coming climate crisis, we must protect the Amazon rainforest and defend the rights of its peoples.

Join us at amazonwatch.org

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The Munduruku of Brazil have been taking a stand against the planned hydroelectric dam complex that will destroy their Amazon homes. They, like indigenous peoples around the world, are the best protectors of forests and therefore crucial to climate change mitigation.
Learn more at Amazonwatch.org

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These little guys are poison dart frogs, which can be found throughout the Amazon basin - though this pair was photographed in Yasuni Biosphere Reserve in Ecuador.
Fun fact: these frogs secrete poison through glands in the skin, which protects them from fungi, bacteria, and predators.
They, like all Yasuni inhabitants, are threatened by oil drilling.

Photo by Bejat McKracken

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Last week we helped install solar power & communication units in Sápara territory in the Ecuadorian Amazon. This project, a partnership with @empoweredbylight, will allow the various Sápara communities to communicate internally and with the outside world, and have access to reliable, clean energy for community needs. As these communities work to protect their territories from the fossil fuel industry, having access to alternative renewable energy sources is of the utmost importance.

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