Amazon Watch Official

Supporting indigenous peoples. Protecting the Amazon. Join us for a visual journey through the most biodiverse place on the planet!

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The Amazon rainforest is a thing of beauty whether it鈥檚 sunny, cloudy, foggy, raining...
This photo we took on an early morning boat ride down the Pastaza River in the Peruvian Amazon after a visit with the Achuar. The cool night most still hung heavy at that early hour.

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This is our friend and partner Patricia Gualinga. She鈥檚 Kichwa of Sarayaku, Ecuador, and a world-renowned voice for indigenous land rights and the urgent need to keep fossil fuels in the ground in the Amazon and around the world.
Last week rocks were thrown at her house and the assailant yelled death threats at her. More info is on our website. This is the kind of danger that those who work to defend indigenous rights and the environment are facing.

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It鈥檚 a new year so we鈥檙e thinking a lot about the future. Will there be a healthy Amazon rainforest for these Achuar children to continue to call home? We鈥檙e committed to doing all we can to assuring that future. Will you join us?

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Wishing you and yours a 2018 filled with joy, beauty, and resistance!

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We went back in the archives to bring you this photo, taken in 2008 in the Xingu River basin in Brazil. The Xicrin-Kayap贸 people, like those in this photo, rely on riverboat transport to navigate the Xingu River, an Amazon River tributary.

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The banks of the Pastaza River in the Peruvian Amazon, are home to Achuar, Shuar, Quechua and Kandoshi communities. We visited in October on our way to the biannual gathering of the Achuar federation, FENAP, which took place in the Achuar village of Tsekuntsa.

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Defending the Amazon rainforest means that this young Achuar boy will still have a place to live when he grows up. Help support him and his future with a donation today. It will be doubled between now and the end of #givingtuesday!
amazonwatch.org/donate

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This is one of the many masato bowls that wound its way through the Achuar assembly in which we participated last month. Drinking masato, a yucca-based fermented drink, is a key ritual in Achuar culture. Women make and decorate these bowls by hand, and each one is unique.

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The Achuar of Peru have successfully kicked three oil companies out of their territory in recent years, and now they鈥檙e gearing up for fight #4: Chile-based GeoPark is aiming to start drilling there soon.
We visited them in October and they reiterated their intention to protect their territory this time, too. And we鈥檒l stand with them.

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We just got back from a trip to the Peruvian Amazon, visiting the Achuar in some of their villages along the Pastaza River. Stay tuned for more updates from Achuar territory!

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This little guy wishes you a happy #worldanimalday!

He's a hula bifurca tree frog caught by photographer Bejat McCracken in a field of heliconia at the Tiputini Biodiversity Station in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

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The trees of the Amazon rainforest are powerful and beautiful, and provide a crucial role in maintaining the balance of the region's - and the globe's - climate.

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On the 10th anniversary of #UNDRIP, we celebrate the progress made and call to mind the work left to be done to truly achieve full respect for #indigenousrights.
In this photo, indigenous peoples from around Brazil rally at Rio鈥檚 Flamengo Beach in 2012. They gather d there during the Rio +20 summit to promote the importance of free-running rivers, truly clean energy sources like solar power and including indigenous knowledge as part of the solution to climate issues. The activity was led by Brazil鈥檚 many indigenous peoples organized under the umbrella of the Articulation of Brazilian Indigenous Peoples.
Photo by @carobennett

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The Amazon River and its tributaries provide for transport, food, drinking, bathing, and recreation needs of indigenous communities. This Achuar boy had just returned from a fishing trip when this photo was taken, during an Amazon Watch trip to Peru in 2010.

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This delicate orchid was found in Yasuni National Park in the Ecuadorian Amazon by wildlife photographer Bejat McCracken. Isn't the biodiversity of the Amazon incredible?

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For #worldphotoday we wanted to share one of our fav photos of the gorgeous treasure that is the Amazon. ...
This shot was taken in 2014 along the Mara帽贸n River, an Amazon River tributary in Peru.

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Brazil's indigenous peoples know well the meaning of the world #resistance. For centuries, they have resisted assaults on their rights and territories, like these indigenous people of the Xing煤 River basin protested the Belo Monte dam in 2012.
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Today, too, indigenous peoples in Brazil are resisting new attempts to attack their rights and territories, rollbacks led by the country's agribusiness sector and green-lighted by the current president.
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Learn more at amazonwatch.org

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This #indigenousday, Amazon Watch honors our brave indigenous partners who every day defend their rights, land, and our climate. ..
Despite the rain, in 2016 this U'wa woman and hundreds of other U'wa and local communities peacefully occupied a gas plant that the Colombian government installed on U'wa ancestral territory in the cloud forests of the Andean-Amazon border region. ..
Join Amazon Watch as we partner with fierce defenders of land and life like the U'wa: amazonwatch.org/donate
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Photo: @coronadosebastian

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Happy #internationalcatday! This ocelot is from Yasuni National Park in the Ecuadorian Amazon. They and the entire forest are at risk from new oil drilling. #endamazoncrude

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This cutie is a squirrel monkey. Though found throughout the tropical forests of Central and South America, this one was photographed in the Ecuadorian Amazon by @kathleen.vanoppen.
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Squirrel monkeys don't use their tails as a 5th limb like many monkeys from the region, but they do use them like balancing poles. --
馃悞 馃悞

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S谩para children walk through the outskirts of their village deep in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Our colleague took this photo during a trip in April with @empoweredbylight, during which we helped the S谩para install solar energy and communications systems to power their resistance to oil drilling in their ancestral territory.

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Gloria Ushigua, a leader of the S谩para people of the Ecuadorian Amazon, speaks before delivering a letter from the S谩para to the Chinese Consulate in San Francisco. The letter demands that state-run oil company Andes Peteoleum cancel plans to drill on S谩para territory. If drilling happens, the S谩para and their rainforest homes face massive destruction.
You can take action solidarity here: http://www.ienearth.org/defend-the-sapara-people/

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This beauty is a male collared tragon. These birds, found in the warmest parts of Central and South America, nest in holes in termite nests or trees, and feed on insects and fruit.
Photo by @kathleen.vanoppen

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In the distance you can see the Achuar village of Kuyuntsa on the Manchari River in the Peruvian Amazon.
The Achuar have been protecting their ancestry territory for millennia, most recently defending it from oil drilling by a Canadian company then known as Talisman. Today, a new company, Geopark, wants to drill on the territory - and the Achuar have pledged to continue to protect their forests and rivers.

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"There's no solution to #ClimateChange that doesn't include protecting the #AmazonRainforest." Our Director Leila Salazar-L贸pez explains why your support of Amazon Watch is so critical for the rainforest, its peoples, and the global climate.
We have until June 30 to raise $250,000! Will you join us? https://amazonwatch.org/donate (link also in bio)

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On #worldrefugeeday we honor the indigenous peoples who have been or will be displaced from their homes as the result of industrial development projects on their ancestral territory.
The men pictured are from some of the 18 indigenous ethnicities of the Xingu that participated in a 2011 gathering organized to coordinate resistance to the Belo Monte dam. Now that the dam construction has moved ahead, Xingu peoples are at risk of forced migration due to the irreparable damage being done to the water and forest systems in which they rely for survival.

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The enormous circular leaves of the Amazonian giant water lily (Victoria amazonica), which can reach over 2.5m across, are anchored by long stalks arising from an underground stem buried in the mud of the riverbottom. The leaves first appear as spiny heads but expand rapidly up to half square meter per day. This one was photographed by @kathleen.vanoppen near Manaus, Brazil.

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Many of the birds of the Amazon, like this aracari, are boldly colorful. Like others in the toucan family, aracaris make their nests in tree hollows, and when eggs hatch the young emerge with no down, completely naked.
Photo by Bejat McCracken

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Isn't the Amazon rainforest incredibly beautiful?
Photo by @Kathleen.Vanoppen

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This is S么nia Bone Guajajara, the national coordinator of Brazil's Association of Indigenous Peoples (APIB) and tireless spokeswoman for the country's indigenous movement. She hails from a Guajajara village in the state of Maranh茫o. Today S么nia regularly confronts her adversaries from Brazil's ruralista agribusiness bloc face-to-face, steadfastly pushing back against their manifold attacks on indigenous rights.
Read more about S么nia's work and the Brazilian government's severe rollbacks on indigenous rights and environmental protections on our website.

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