Everyday Climate Change

Climate Change is Real! A diverse group of photographers from 6 continents document climate change. Share your photos with #everydayclimatechange.

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Photo by Georgina Goodwin @ggkenya for @everydayclimatechange. .
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Aerial over the rice paddies and villages of south-east #Madagascar. The country is now experiencing a large fluctuation in rainfall patterns, increased temperatures, and larger severe weather events over the past few decades. These changes are not only affecting the wildlife but the Malagasy people as well. Recently, Madagascar has been showing longer dry periods and more intense downpours during the rainy season. The country is surprisingly poor for one so rich in resources, and there is virtually no road network. Here in the south it rains for 10 months of the year which makes any road that is there impassable. More severe rain and drought seasons will have severe consequences for the population who cannot move to even to get to medical facilities during the wet season, and lose most of their crops (rice) from drought during the dry season. Such local isolation means women must give birth at home and if there are any complications there is a much higher chance of the birth causing a fistula, a hole in the birth canal caused by prolonged childbirth which leaves the woman with chronic incontinence and in many cases a stillborn baby. Women who are incontinent suffering with fistula will be less likely to reach the medical facilities where corrective surgery is offered so they will suffer for longer. Creating climate and health awareness programs, better infrastructure and roads, and forest restoration projects are all things that can be done to help mitigate this trend!
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#climatechange #climatechangeisreal @fistula_foundation #globalwarming everydayclimatechange #women #myfeatureshoot #documentary #womenphotojournalism @NatGeo #natgeohub @Catchlight.io @magnumfoundation @dysturb #ReportageSpotlight #mycanon #visualsgang #canonphotos #toldwithexposure #apjd #water #poverty #ic_landscapes #river #Africa

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everydayclimatechange photo by John Novis @johnnovis for 
#everydayclimatechange
High winds and stormy seas batter the Rottingdean promenade in Sussex, South of England coast in a prelude to a second weather system coming days after the remnants of Hurricane Ophelia caused widespread disruption to Ireland, northern England and Scotland. Climate change is creating the ability for hurricanes to sustain themselves as they travel north in increasing warmer seas and is expected to be a continuing trend, putting Europe potentially in the firing line further extreme weather conditions.
#climatechange 
#climatechangeisreal
#everydayclimatechange
#everydayclimatechange
#globalwarming
#hurricanebrian
#orphelia
#nofilter

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Photo by James Whitlow Delano @jameswhitlowdelano for @everydayclimatechange

Vendors sell local produce at the weekly market in a region recovering from drought. The rains finally arrived heavier than usual in the summer of 2016, ending the worse drought in decades, but experts worried that the rains were so heavy that they might lead to crop failures. This region in the Northern Ethiopian Highland is rated by USAID as at risk of "high" to "extreme" food insecurity. Lalibela, Ethiopia
Climate scientists tell us to expect more wild swings in weather from dry to wet and back again, especially in marginal climates like the Ethiopian Highlands that depend heavily on seasonal rains. According to the UNDP, 80% of Ethiopia's workforce are employed in the agriculture sector. The arrival of the seasonal rains, failure to arrive or the arrivals of floods is a high stakes business for the Ethiopian people and climate change is introducing even greater uncertainty.

#climatechange #globalwarming #foodinsecurity #rains #flood #drought #Africa #Ethiopia #EthiopianHighl

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Photo by Will Baxter @baxpix for @everydayclimatechange

A woman cuts firewood near #Kakuma in #Turkana county, #Kenya, August 30, 2017. Turkana, Kenya's least-developed county, is experiencing what many call "the worst drought in living memory". Water shortages and lack of pastureland has driven many #pastoralists to take what remains of their herds over the border into #Uganda.
#photojournalism #Africa

#documentaryphotography #climatechange #drought #desertification #globalwarming
#migration #displacement #charcoal

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@paoloverzone: Nico Bornemann engineer of the The Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research at work on permafrost measurements,
Sar-Dakh Island Siberia.
What is permafrost?
Researchers use the term permafrost, or permanently frozen ground, when the temperature of the ground remains under zero degrees Celsius for at least two consecutive years. The material can consist of rock, sediment or soil, and can contain varying quantities of ice. In some regions of the Arctic, the makeup is 70 percent ice. Especially Northeast Siberia experienced extremely long and cold winters during the last ice ages, lasting from about 100,000 to 10,000 years ago. At the same time, the ground there was not protected by an ice sheet, and cold air deeply penetrated into the ground. As a result, the permafrost in this region reaches deep into the Earth – extending as far as 1.7 kilometres down. Most permafrost landscapes can be recognised by the typical patterning of their surface, for example polygons, formed by repeated deep freezing in winter. The very cold Arctic winter temperatures cause the frozen soils to contract across the land surface, resulting in a regular pattern of cracks much like drying cracks. Subsequently, the centimetre-wide and meter-deep cracks are then filled with snow melt water during the spring thaw. Thanks to the soil’s intense cold, the water then refreezes, creating vertical veins of ice that grow over decades to millennia into ice wedges.

#awi #permafrost #siberia #russia#climatechange #globalwarming

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everydayclimatechange photo by John Novis @johnnovis for 
#everydayclimatechange
The British Airways i360 observation tower is seen against a darkened sky in the middle of the afternoon on Brighton Seafront, Sussex, UK. Extreme weather caused by climate change has forced hurricane Ophelia, originating in the Azores northwards, dragging tropical air from the Sahara with it. The met office claimed a mixture of forest fires in Iberia and Saharan dust, have sent debris into the air causing the dust to be dragged high in the atmosphere.
#climatechange 
#climatechangeisreal
#everydayclimatechange
#everydayclimatechange
#globalwarming
#ophelia
#nofilter

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Photo by Monirul Alam @meghmonir for @everydayclimatechange~ Bangladesh, Gaibandha October 2016 - Rupali Begum, 20 years old, with her two baby takes poses for photos in front of her father’s houses in Gaibandha Sadar Upazila, where she live. When she read in class seven she was married due to an economic problem. She was not wanted as early married but her family to do it for the reality. She said, married girl suffer many complication, like me. She lives with her father’s house. Her husband works abroad. She takes care her two baby's, household works. Some time she try to swing works for money to support her family. Rupali also said, During the rainy season sometimes over flooded their homes and displayed them,than they face lot of problem.In Bangladesh has one of the highest rates of early marriage in the world. Almost two-thirds of the women between 20 and 24 were married before the age 18, according to a national survey by Plan Bangladesh and ICDDR,B in 2013.

Climate change is arguably one of the largest threats to global development and security. When we think about climate change, we might picture rising sea levels, scarce resources and natural disasters. But climate change is also driving rates of child marriage around the world.Floods, droughts and natural disasters have forced thousands of farmers in rural Bangladesh out of work by destroying their crops, livestock and homes. Many of these families choose to migrate to Dhaka in search of employment where the costs of living are much higher.

The negative impact of child marriage is acknowledge worldwide and consequently there are a host of policies and programmers that focus strongly on its prevention.Young married girls are more likely to drop out of school and consequently, miss opportunities in gainful employment later in life. Teenage pregnancy, before the age of physical maturity, increases the risk of birth complications and giving birth to a low-birth-weight baby, which is closely linked to child stunting. Climate Change is my long-term project where I began to document of marginal condition in my own country of Bangladesh. © Monirul Alam / WITNESS PHOTO
#climatechange #bangladesh#child

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Photo by Georgina Goodwin @ggkenya for @everydayclimatechange.
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Women from the Mkombezi Rice Scheme in Malawi's south Chikwawa region carve out irrigation channels for rice and maize seeds with home-made wooden hoes and their bare hands. They worked for hours in the hot sun without a break, some as old as 75. Each plants and harvests just 0.3ha. The 2015 and 2016 rains failed in Malawi, it left 2.8 million people food insecure because of drought and flooding according to the World Food Programme. Now in 2017 around 6.7 million people, roughly half of Malawi's rural population, are in need of food assistance says FEMS NET (Famine Early Warning System Network).
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Climate change is posing many challenges in Malawi where 84% are rural people who depend on the rain for subsistence farming. Women make up 70% of the agricultural workforce and remain the largest proportion of the poor. Social and cultural gender roles and responsibilities, and limited access to resources means women in rural Africa continue to be the most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.
Assignment for @catholicreliefservices. Check out my instagram story 👆for more beautiful images from this story about how coming together we can overcome the effects of climate change! .
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#climatechange #globalwarming #documentary #womeninphotojournalism #womenempowerment
#farming #ourplanetdaily #feedfeed #commontable #myfeatureshoot #rural #Malawi #foodsecurity #liveauthentic #followmetoo #mycanon #earthfocus #visualsoflife #mycanon #ReportageSpotlight @catchlight.io @gettyreportage #apjd @leonardodicaprio

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Photographs by @paolopatrizi for @everydayclimatechange

In the late 1990s, Lake Urmia, in north-western Iran, was twice as large as Luxembourg and the largest salt-water lake in the Middle East. Since then it has shrunk substantially, and was sliced in half in 2008, with consequences uncertain to this day, by a 15-km causeway designed to shorten the travel time between the cities of Urmia and Tabriz. Historically, the lake attracted migratory birds including flamingos, pelicans, ducks and egrets. Its drying up, or desiccation, is undermining the local food web, especially by destroying one of the world’s largest natural habitats of the brine shrimp Artemia, a hardy species that can tolerate salinity levels of 340 grams per litre, more than eight times saltier than ocean water. Effects on humans are perhaps even more complicated. The tourism sector has clearly lost out. While the lake once attracted visitors from near and far, some believing in its therapeutic properties, Urmia has turned into a vast salt-white barren land with beached boats serving as a striking image of what the future may hold.

Desiccation will increase the frequency of salt storms that sweep across the exposed lakebed, diminishing the productivity of surrounding agricultural lands and encouraging farmers to move away. Poor air, land, and water quality all have serious health effects including respiratory and eye diseases .

The results of an investigation, which recently appeared in the Journal of Great Lakes Research, revealed that in September 2014 the lake’s surface area was about 12% of its average size in the 1970s, a far bigger fall than previously realised. The research undermines any notion of a crisis caused primarily by climate changes. It shows that the pattern of droughts in the region has not changed significantly, and that Lake Urmia survived more severe droughts in the past.

#climatechange#globalwarming#extremeweather#everydayclimatechange#climatechangeisreal #drought #Iran

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@paoloverzone : Night arrival at the Arctic research station Samoylov island together with the participants of the Russian-German Lena expedition 2017.
The research station island Samoylov offers Russian and German researchers the possibility to examine the permafrost in the Lena Delta (Siberia) and to draw conclusions in regard to past and current climate events.
The base Samoylov Island is situated on the eponymous island in the Lena Delta. Located in the northeast of Siberia, the delta extends over 150 kilometres into the Laptev Sea and represents one of Russia’s largest conservation areas. The region is crucial to understanding the processes at work in the permafrost of the Siberian Arctic, making it a natural magnet for the researchers. #climatechange #environment #globalwarming #permafrost #siberia #russia

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Photo by @jbrussell for @everydayclimatechange Food insecurity and malnutrition are some of the very real and tragic consequences of climate change. A mother holding her severely malnurished and ill child as a doctor tests the child for a variety of medical conditions in the Save The Children malnutrition clinic at the Aguie hospital in the Maradi region of southern Niger. Located in the Western Sahel, the landlocked country suffers from chronic malnutrition and food insecurity caused by climate related drought and erratic rainy seasons, inadequate arable land, one of the highest demographic growth rates in the world, poor social and sanitary living conditions and widespread poverty. Food insecurity affects children under five and women disproportionately, especially in rural areas. The effects of climate change exacerbate already precarious situations for millions of people in Africa and around the world. Aguie, Niger. #climatechangeisreal #climatechange #globalwarming #environment #hunger #foodsecurity #malnutrition #savethechildren #Africa #niger #sahel #childhunger

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Photo by James Whitlow Delano @jameswhitlowdelano for @everydayclimatechange

Fish laid out by artisanal fishermen to dry north of Pondicherry. Fish hauls, however, have decreased due to overfishing. Conservation India conducted a study in 2010 85% of all artisanal fishermen surveyed had experienced diclines in fish catch. 61% of India's artisanal fishering families live below the poverty line due to overfishing, pollution and intensified storms due to climate change. Climate change is also inducing more farming families to flee draught, mostly, and flood to take up fishing. Meanwhile most trawler fishermen admitted to not obeying laws which prevent them from fishing within 3 nautical miles (5.6 km) of shore putting them in direct competition with artisanal fishermen. Pondicherry, India.
#climatechange #globalwarming #India #warmingseas #fisheries #poverty #TamilNadu

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We're pleased to announce:
Everydayclimatechange Instagram Feed has been invited to exhibit at LuganoPhotoDays, Lugano, Switzerland.
11 November to 19 November 2017
The sixth edition of @LuganoPhotoDays is focused on climate change , an increasingly important issue because it affects the entire planet. Climate change is often seen or interpreted as a "problem of others", geographically or temporally distant from us, while it is already happening "right here and right now".
This exhibition is curated by @photo_op_milan
Picture by @ggkenya #everydayclimatechange #climatechange #climatechangeisreal #globalwarming

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Photo by Monirul Alam @meghmonir for @everydayclimatechange ~In Bangladesh, the Brahmaputra river is joined by the Tista river one of its largest tributaries. Below the Tista, the Brahmaputra splits into two distributary branches. The western branch, which contains the majority of the river’s flow, continues due south as the Jamuna to merge with the lower Ganges called as Padma river. The eastern branch formerly the larger, but now much smaller is called the lower or old Brahmaputra.Mymensingh district stands just beside the old Brahmaputra river. It curves southeast to join the Meghna River near Dhaka. The Padma and Meghna converge near Chandpur and flow out into the Bay of Bengal. This final part of the river is called Meghna. Climate Change is my long-term project where I began to document of marginal condition in my own country of Bangladesh. © Monirul Alam
#climatechange #globalwarming #bangladesh#Brahmaputra#documentary#river#forest#asia#monirulalam#erosion#migration #river #flood #disaster#river#droughty #cyclone#everdayclimatechange#witnessphoto

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Photo by Esther Horvath @estherhorvath for @everydayclimatechange Arctic sea ice extent reached its minimum on September 13th and it is the eighth lowest in the 38-year satellite record. Conditions at Chukchi and Beaufort seas off Alaska have been extreme. Ice extent has reached record low for the region and there is open water farther north in the Beaufort Sea than at any time in the satellite record going back to 1979. Since 2009 Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research has been running an airplane-based Arctic sea ice thickness study producing highly accurate, direct ice thickness data using an electromagnetic instrument. According to the scientists, since 2011 the multi-year ice coverage (5 years or older) has become less than 5 % of the total sea ice cover in the Arctic. In the middle of the 80's it still made up almost a third of the sea ice surface. The Arctic Ocean will become ice free if only first-year sea ice remains in the winter while multi-year ice doesn't build up. On the photo: Flying over Arctic Ocean with Polar 6 research aircraft of Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research during Arctic ice thickness measurement campaign. #climatechange #globalwarming #arctic #arcticocean #science #research #alfredwegenerinstitute @ilcp_photographers

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Photo by Amnon Gutman @gutmanen for @everydayclimatechange
Three refugees from Afghanistan washing themselves in a river close to the Greek-Macedonian border during a very hot spring day.
Even under an intermediate scenario, the Greek mainland in 2071-2100 would, compared to now, have some 35-40 more days with a maximum daily temperature of 35 C or more, while even greater would be the increase (by around 50 at the national level) in the number of tropical nights (when minimum temperatures do not fall below 20C). At the other end of the spectrum, the number of nights with frost is expected to drop significantly, especially in Northern Greece (by as many as 40). Changes are also expected in precipitation extremes. In Eastern Greece and NW Macedonia, the maximum amount of precipitation occurring within 3-day periods is expected to increase by as much as 30%, whereas in Western Greece it is expected to decrease by as much as 20%. By contrast, the greatest increases in drought periods are projected for the eastern part of the mainland and for Northern Crete, where 20 more drought days are expected per year in 2021-2050 and up to 40 more drought days are expected in 2071-2100.
#climatechange #globalwarming# #climatechangegreece

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Photo by James Whitlow Delano @jameswhitlowdelano for @everydayclimatechange

Young men guide two papier-mâché statues of Ganesh by rope as it is being delivered to the surf by a crane for the Ganesh Chaturthi Festival from a beach protected by a sea wall built after the 2004 Asian Tsunami. Pondicherry, India. It is not the seismically-induced tsunami, however, that poses the ongoing threat to the coastlines of Pondicherry and Tamil Nadu, which surrounds this former-French enclave. Climate change-induced sea rise and more intense cyclones that warmer sea waters regularly unleash on this coast means that many coastal villages are beginning to pull back from the sea as homes are undermined by eroded beaches.

#climatechange #globalwarming #risingseas #cyclones #tropicalstorms #warmseas #India #TamilNadu #Pondicherry

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Image by @sean_gallagher_photo With typhoon Hato lashing southern China recently, the few remaining mangrove forests in the region acted as a buffer, soaking up storm surges and reducing coastal damage. Unfortunately the south of China has seen rapid development in recent decades, resulting in the clearance of the region's mangroves. This has left coastal communities vulnerable to damage from increasingly intense tropical storms. --- Mangroves lie in coastal regions and consist of trees found in salty brackish waters. They are one of the most biodiverse ecosystems on earth but often receive little attention. According to WWF, "More than 35% of the world’s mangroves are already gone. The figure is as high as 50% in countries such as India, the Philippines, and Vietnam, while in the Americas they are being cleared at a rate faster than tropical rainforests." This is because of human clearance for agriculture, development and fishing. These unique ecosystems are valued not just for their biodiversity but also for their ability to protect coastlines from rising sea levels, storm surges and for filtering pollution. Their global decline is alarming scientists across the world. #asia #china #guangdong #mangroves #climatechange #climate #environment @pulitzercenter

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Photo by Matilde Gattoni @matildegattoni for @everydayclimatechange ~ As a direct consequence of global warming and sea level rise, more than 7,000 kms of coastline from Mauritania to Cameroon are eroding at a pace of up to 36 metres per year, disrupting the lives of tens of millions of people in thirteen countries. While local governments scramble to salvage big cities and industrial complexes, thousands of villages are being left out in the cold, pushing a thousands-year-old way of life on the brink of extinction.

Once home to thriving fishing settlements, the coastline of Ghana and Togo is now a sequence of crumbling buildings and ghost towns which have been swallowed by the ocean in little more than 20 years. As climate change wipes away houses, churches and plantations, it also destroys the livelihood, cultural heritage and social fabric of entire communities, with dangerous consequences for the future of the whole continent.

Rising temperatures have prompted fish stocks to move to cooler waters away from the coasts, starving the local fishing industry, while erosion and salinization have affected agriculture by reducing the quantity of arable land and contaminating freshwater reserves. Deprived of their means of survival and with no hope for the future, communities lose their most resourceful people to migration. As rampant unemployment drives drugs and alcohol consumption, the only profitable activities are offered by criminal syndicates involved in fuel smuggling and illegal sand mining.

Far from being an isolated issue, the problems haunting West Africa now are the harbinger of what mankind will experience if we won't be able to find a viable balance between progress, social inequality and environmental conservation. In a world where progress is synonymous with urbanization and consumerism, the lives of traditional communities are constantly being sacrificed on the altar of modernity, even when the increasing pressure on natural resources should prompt an overhaul of our priorities. This conundrum is becoming the most pressing issue of our times. #westafrica #oceanrage #africa #climatechange #climatechangeisreal

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Photo by Ashley Crowther @ashleycrowtherorg for @everydayclimatechange: Yak's carry supplies high into the Everest Himalayan region located in Nepal. The Himalayas have long been called the Earth's third pole, as contains the world's largest stores of ice that are located outside of the polar regions.
Due to this vast amount of ice the glaciers feed some of the largest rivers across Asia, including the Ganges, Yangtze, Indus, and Bhramaputra. These rivers and scores more, which cross international boundaries, support the lives of billions of people from agriculture to industry.
As climate change intensifies, this gigantic store of ice that is locked up in the mountains is quickly melting. The vast majority of glaciers across the Himalayan region are retreating at a rapid pace.
The melting, in the short-term, may provide greater access to water resources throughout Asia. However, in the long-term, the threat that global warming poses on the Earth's third pole threatens the water security of billions, as the ice continually retreats more and more. —
#everydayclimatechange #climatechange #climatechangeisreal #globalwarming #photojournalism #nepal #asia #southasia #himalayas #environment #watersecurity

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Mette Lampcov @mettelampcov for @everydayclimatechange -
A sister and brother are having fun playing in there grandmother's pool, cooling down in a heatwave. California had one of the wettest winters taking the state out of a 5 year exceptional drought, the highest setting that the Drought Monitoring Center uses.This precipitation allowed for an above average snowpack that helped fill up California’s empty reservoirs that are now full . For this coming winter, climate scientists are trying to make predictions, for a state that would like to keep seeing more rain and water. With California's temperatures rising 2-3 degrees F, and ocean temperatures rising, climate change is making weather harder and harder to predict.

#climatechangeisreal #californialandscape #california #waterislife #swimming #owensvalley
#ranchlife #waterisfun #climate #landscapephotography #documentryphotography #Californiawater #sierranevada #eastensierras

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everydayclimatechange photo by John Novis @johnnovis for 
#everydayclimatechange
Aerial view of a herd of camels from a camel riding tourist attraction located in the city of Dunhuang, Gansu, China. The city is taking steps to halt increasing desertification. The local government in Dunhuang, a county level city, has launched a range of waters saving measures to try to tackle the problem. Drought, one of the most harmful natural hazards in Northwest China and has a significant impact on China's environment and economy. The iconic Silk Road was the world's first superhighway, a series of desert and mountain crossings that enabled silk to make its way from the ancient Chinese capital of Xian. The Silk Road allowed links between China and the West to flourish, encouraging an exchange of art, ideas and culture as well as trade. Desertification and drought, a result of climate change, has taken its toll on the Silk Road. The once great civilizations dotted along the road have now been consumed by the desert and the region is home to some of China's poorest people. The Silk Road is considered a climate hot spot, like the poles, where climate change is accelerating faster than in other areas. However, there is a twist to the story. Many parts of the Silk Road have exceptionally powerful wind and solar resource locations. It is where China is now building massive wind farms and the renewable industry is starting to flourish. Green factories are springing up everywhere along the route, most notably in Gansu and Xinjiang. 
#climatechange 
#climatechangeisreal
#everydayclimatechange
#everydayclimatechange
#globalwarming
#nofilter
@greenpeace

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Photo by @matildegattoni for @everydayclimatechange

Togo - Lomé - A local woman sits on a pile of sand she has been mining on the beach. Aside from climate change, other man-made activities such as sand mining, mangroves harvesting, river dams and the construction of deep-sea ports have increased coastal erosion by either preventing sediments from reaching the coasts of by disrupting their natural movements.

As a direct consequence of global warming and sea level rise, more than 7,000 kms of coastline from Mauritania to Cameroon are eroding at a pace of up to 36 metres per year, disrupting the lives of tens of millions of people in thirteen countries. While local governments scramble to salvage big cities and industrial complexes, thousands of villages are being left out in the cold, pushing a thousands-year-old way of life on the brink of extinction.

Once home to thriving fishing settlements, the coastline of Ghana and Togo is now a sequence of crumbling buildings and ghost towns which have been swallowed by the ocean in little more than 20 years. As climate change wipes away houses, churches and plantations, it also destroys the livelihood, cultural heritage and social fabric of entire communities, with dangerous consequences for the future of the whole continent.

#togo #africa #sandmining #climatechangeisreal #climatechange #everydayclimatechange

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Photo by @jbrussell for @everydayclimatechange A mother holding her severely malnurished and ill child in the Save The Children malnutrition clinic at the Aguie hospital in the Maradi region of southern Niger. Located in the Western Sahel, the landlocked country suffers from chronic malnutrition and food insecurity caused by climate related drought and erratic rainy seasons, inadequate arable land, one of the highest demographic growth rates in the world, poor social and sanitary living conditions and widespread poverty. Food insecurity affects children under five and women disproportionately, especially in rural areas. The effects of climate change exacerbate already precarious situations for millions of people in Africa and around the world. Aguie, Niger. #climatechangeisreal #climatechange #globalwarming #environment #hunger #foodsecurity #malnutrition #savethechildren #Africa #niger #sahel #childhunger

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Photo by James Whitlow Delano @jameswhitlowdelano for @everydayclimatechange
Orang utan in the rainforest canopy, Interior Sarawak (Borneo), Malaysia. A Scientific America article in 2016 put the Bornean orang utan population at 47,000 by the year 2025. Populations are already down 60% since 1950, from massive habitat loss from deforestation and oil palm plantation expansion and hunting. The Bornean orang utan now joins its Sumatran cousin on the critically endangered list. The Scientific American article puts the Sumatran orang utan population at 14,000, while NGO's are far less optimistic on their numbers. WWF puts Sumatran orang utan numbers at 7,500. Alan Knight, chief executive of International Animal Rescue (IAR) characterized the Sumatra orang utan as on the "precipice of extinction" to the Independent Newpaper in 2016. Knight believes the Sumatran orang utan could be extinct in 10 years unless the situation of habitat loss to oil palm and hunting is brought under control. "We are losing that battle", he says.

This forest in the photograph, upstream from the Batang Ai Dam, remains one of the very few large swathes of forest untouched by loggers for fear that logging debris washed downstream would jam in the hydroelectric turbines. In a perverse sense this orang utan is lucky, for her habitat has been left undisturbed to protect a dam downstream and investors’ profits. The local indigenous Iban Dayak peoples are also able to earn hard cash from trekkers who want to see Borneo’s quickly diminishing population of orang utan. Still, this doesn't change the fact that the seemingly unstoppable expansion of oil palm plantations in Borneo and Sumatra, with the prerequisite clear-cut logging, is destroying orang utan habitat, changing the climate by releasing carbon that is sequestered in organic matter, drying out & heating up the land, and pushing the orang utan, one of humanity's closest relatives, to the brink of extinction.

#everydayextinction #orangutan #biodiversity #deforestation #oilpalm #borneo #sumatra #malaysia #indonesia #conservation #wildlife #palmoil #consumption

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ECC member @sean_gallagher_photo has recently founded @everydayextinction with an exceptional pool of photographers. Please take a look at their important work.

Image by @AdrianSteirnThis was Hope, a four-year-old South African female white rhino (Ceratotherium simum) who was attacked by poachers in 2015. She’d been darted with tranquilising drugs and her horn was hacked off, she was then left for dead. Against all odds, she survived. Through the efforts of @SavingTheSurvivors Hope began to recover, she inspired conservationists and people from across the globe with her enduring spirit. Unfortunately, since then, despite all the efforts taken to ensure Hope was able to live a normal life, she succumbed to a bacterial infection in her small intestine in late 2016 after enduring several grueling operations. Hope’s story may have ended, but her legacy lives on, and she has given new energy to those fighting to save this beautiful species. White rhinos are listed as near threatened on the IUCN Red List. For more information or to assist, visit: http://www.savingthesurvivors.org/

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everydayclimatechange photo by John Novis @johnnovis for 
#everydayclimatechange
Dabancheng wind farm’s location, in a natural wind tunnel in China’s Xinjiang province makes it one of the best situated in the world. It is one of the largest wind farms in China with a total of 300 wind towers bringing new 'green' jobs to the region. China is rapidly expanding its wind power generating capacity and has set a target for renewable energy consumption of 40 percent of the market by the year 2050.
The Dabancheng wind farm is found on the iconic Silk Road, the world's first superhighway between China and the West which enabled exchange of art, ideas and culture as well as trade to flourish. Desertification and drought, a result of climate change, has now taken its toll on the Silk Road and is considered a climate hot spot, like the poles, where climate change is accelerating faster than in other areas. Ironically many parts of the Silk Road have exceptionally powerful wind and solar resource locations. It is where China is now building massive wind farms and the renewable industry is starting to flourish. Green factories are springing up everywhere along the route, most notably in Gansu and Xinjiang making the Silk Road a significant factor in today’s energy revolution.
#climatechange 
#climatechangeisreal
#everydayclimatechange
#globalwarming
#drought
#desert
#xinjiang #china
#silkroad
#windfarm
#windturbines
#renewableenergy
#highway
#motorway
#nofilter
#photooftheday
@greenpeace

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Photo by Esther Horvath @estherhorvath for @everydayclimatechange Due to the warming temperatures, the Arctic is undergoing unprecedented change as the summer sea ice continues to shrink. As the ice contracts, shipping, oil and gas exploration along with tourism increase within and across the Arctic. This increasing traffic and oil exploration may have serious environmental consequences because much of the Arctic marine ecosystem is highly vulnerable to disturbance and pollution. The US Coast Guard has to be prepared to respond to boat accidents, oil spills and environmental disasters in the remote areas of the Arctic Ocean. This work is crucial to help prevent and manage environmental catastrophes in order to protect the marine habitat in the Arctic Ocean. In the photo: A Puma drone, a critical new tool for the Coast Guard, is launched from the Healy’s bow. Competition in the Arctic among countries such as Russia, China, and the U.S. has created a need for more eyes on wildlife populations, ice cover and even military activity. For more Arctic stories please follow me on my Instagram @estherhorvath
On Octobe 14, 2017, I am leading a free Conservation Photography Workshop in New York along with @camillacerea and collaboration with @nycaudubon . If you are interested in using visual tools to raise awareness about environmental issues and interested in attending the workshop please contact me for more details. #climatechange #globalwarming #arctic #arcticocean #arcticcircle #ice #icemelt #exploration #ilcp_photographers @ilcp_photographers

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Photo by @matildegattoni for @everydayclimatechange A little girl stands in the ruins of her school recently destroyed by the ocean waves, Fuvemeh, Ghana. #climatechange #climatechangeisreal #ghana #risingsealevel #oceanrage #africa

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Photo by Ashley Crowther @ashleycrowtherorg for @everydayclimatechange: Funeral processions at a Hindu cremation area on the outskirts of New Delhi. As part of a Hindu ritual, family members are burnt over open wood fires for hours. In Hindu dominated India and Nepal, these practices consume over 50 million trees per year and are a significant source of regional carbon aerosols that have been shown to warm up the atmosphere.
When organic matter is burnt, such as in funeral pyres, dark heat absorbing carbon-rich particles are released and help retain heat in the atmosphere. This phenomenon is exacerbating traditional global warming caused by carbon dioxide in regional areas such as South Asia.
One response to funeral pyres generating particulate pollution is the introduction of electric cremation systems. The systems burn cleaner and more efficiently. However, due to the nature of cremation being of cultural importance and people’s decision to follow the scriptures this makes alternatives a difficult choice for many. —
#everydayclimatechange #climatechange #globalwarming #india #southasia #evverydayeverywhere #gettyreportage #climatechangeisreal

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