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Sections of Philadelphia erupted in celebration on Jan. 21 as fans of the @philadelphiaeagles took to the streets after beating the Minnesota Vikings to clinch a spot in this year's Super Bowl. Just in case of a win, police officers greased up light pols with Crisco in a bid to prevent fans from climbing the poles. As this footage shows, it didn't quite work. The Eagles will face off against the New England @Patriots. The Feb. 4 game is a rematch of sorts, as the Eagles lost the Super Bowl to the Patriots in 2005. Video sources: @hunterckurtz, zrjaved, groovyytonyy, WPVI-TV/ABC6 #🏉

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The American embassy in Tel Aviv, Israel, will be moved to Jerusalem and be opened by the end of 2019, Vice President Mike Pence said during an address to Israel's parliament on Jan. 22. Pence received a rousing ovation as he pledged to barrel ahead with a plan that has set off weeks of unrest and thrown U.S. peace efforts into disarray. The move, in the first ever address of a sitting American vice president to the Israeli Knesset, marked the highlight of Pence’s three-day visit to Israel celebrating President Trump’s decision last month to controversially recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. Video sources: AP, CNN

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The Philippines’ most active #volcano exploded thunderously on Jan. 22, sending a huge gray column of ash, steam and lava fragments into the sky and prompting authorities to warn a violent eruption could be imminent. The noontime explosion of Mount Mayon, seen in this timelapse video, shrouded nearby villages in darkness, officials said, the Associated Press reports. More than 27,000 villagers have fled since Mayon started acting up more than a week ago. Authorities raised the alert level to four on a scale of five, which means an explosive eruption is possible within hours or days. A danger zone around Mayon was expanded to 5 miles (8 kilometers) from the crater. Video source: AP

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Aerobatic dancers under the direction of Spanish theatrical company La Fura dels Baus perform in "The Rise of the Tritons" during the opening of the European Capital of Culture program at Valletta 2018 in Malta on Jan. 20. Photograph by Darrin Zammit Lupi (@darrinzl)—@reuters

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In the lower deck of a wooden boat, sub-Saharan refugees and migrants—mostly from Eritrea—wait to be rescued by aid workers from the Spanish NGO @proactivaopenarms, 34 miles north of Libya on Jan. 16. The United Nations has recorded at least 4,085 sea arrivals to Europe in 2018, with at least 184 migrants and refugees dead or missing in the Mediterranean. Photograph by @santipalacios@ap.images/@shutterstock

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Speaking at the #womensmarch in Los Angeles, Natalie Portman detailed the “environment of sexual terrorism” she endured in her youth that impacted the trajectory of her career. @nportmanofficial, one of the actors behind the #TimesUp initiative combatting sexual harassment and abuse in Hollywood and other industries, said she experienced sexual harassment at the age of 13 when her first film, 1994’s Léon: The Professional, came out. Her first-ever piece of fan mail, she said, was a rape fantasy written by a man. Her local radio show created a countdown to her 18th birthday, “euphemistically,” she told the crowd of 500,000 people, “the date that I would be legal to sleep with.” And movie reviewers would mention her “budding breasts” in reviews. Portman said she rejected roles with a “kissing scene” and developed a reputation as “prudish, conservative, nerdy, serious, in an attempt to feel like my body was safe and my voice would be listened to.” Video source: CNN

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"I am speaking today not just for the 'me toos'—because I was a #metoo," @violadavis told a crowd on Jan. 20 during the #womensmarch in Los Angeles. "But when I raise my hand I am aware of all the women who are still in silence. The women who are faceless. The women who don't have the money and don't have the constitution and who don't have the confidence. And who don't have the images in our media that gives them a sense of self worth enough to break their silence that's rooted in the shame of assault." The Academy Award-winning actress took the podium as thousands of women and men in Los Angeles, and across the country, marched on the one-year anniversary of President Trump's inauguration. Video source: CNN #womensmarch

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Across the globe on Jan. 20, people hit the streets on the anniversary of President Trump’s inauguration to march against his policies and in support of the #MeToo movement. In Palm Beach, a group of women wearing red cloaks and white hats like the characters in the book and TV show “The Handmaid’s Tale” marched in formation, their heads bowed. Elsewhere around the U.S., people congregated in New York, Chicago, Houston, Denver, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and more. They were among more than 200 such actions planned for the weekend around the world. Video sources: CNN, CrowdSpark, AP #womensmarch

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Participants attend a rally to honor the one-year anniversary of the Women's March and Park City's March on Main on Jan. 20, 2018. Tens of thousands of women and men packed streets across the country on Saturday, uniting in a call for social change on the first anniversary of the inauguration of President Trump. Photograph by Angela Weiss (@angelaweissphoto)—@afpphoto/@gettyimages #womensmarch

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It is perhaps apt that @nasa is studying #Antarctica the same way it often studies distant worlds—from above, with a flying collection of multisensory instruments. And it is perhaps apt too that so many of the pictures could pass for ones of the barren moon; of broken Mars; of the great, cracked ice-cover of Jupiter’s moon Europa. In November, @pellegrinpaolo joined NASA's IceBridge mission for a series of research flights over the west Antarctic peninsula, chronicling the toll of #climatechange on polar ice. Over the course of eight- to 12-hour expeditions covering up to 2,500 air miles out and back, the flights maintained an average cruising altitude of just 1,500 ft.—and sometimes much lower. Read the TIME International cover story, and see the full photo essay, on TIME.com. Photograph by @pellegrinpaolo@magnumphotos for TIME

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This massive chunk of free-floating sea ice is about 100 ft. thick from waterline to top—or roughly the height of a 10-story building. In November, @pellegrinpaolo joined @nasa's IceBridge mission for a series of research flights over the west Antarctic peninsula. Scientists onboard surveyed the state of the ice with a suite of instruments. No single mission is likely to produce breakthrough results. Rather, the flights yield cumulative data—sometimes granular­ ­findings that can add to the overall picture of polar melt. Read the TIME International cover story, and see the full photo essay, on TIME.com. Photograph by @pellegrinpaolo@magnumphotos for TIME #antarctica #climatechange

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Climate change has become our species’ great destructive equalizer, leaving no part of the planet safe from the harm we do. In March 2017, the sea ice around both poles reached a record low for that time of year. In July, a 1 trillion–ton iceberg, roughly the size of Delaware, calved off of the Larsen C ice shelf in western Antarctica. The damage to the ice is being done not just from above, as the planet’s air warms, but from below, as its oceans do too. In November, @pellegrinpaolo joined @nasa's IceBridge mission for a series of research flights over the west Antarctic peninsula. Scientists onboard surveyed the state of the ice with a suite of instruments including laser altimeters, radars, magneto­meters and gravimeters. No single mission is likely to produce breakthrough results. Rather, IceBridge flights yield cumulative data—sometimes granular­ ­findings that can add to the overall picture of polar melt. Read the full TIME International cover story, and see the full photo essay, on TIME.com. Video by @pellegrinpaolo@magnumphotos for TIME #Antarctica #climatechange

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A crevasse measuring a few thousand feet, seen during a November research flight with @nasa scientists studying the toll of #climatechange on the west Antarctic peninsula. NASA has long employed satellites to monitor weather and climate from space, but the most detailed work requires getting a lot closer. The agency's IceBridge mission fills that gap. Established in 2009, it's an annual series of flights over both polar regions, surveying the state of the ice. Over the course of eight- to 12-hour expeditions covering up to 2,500 air miles out and back, the flights maintain an average cruising altitude of just 1,500 ft.—and sometimes much lower. "Over some mountain ranges we get pretty low, maybe 100 ft. or less," says Nathan Kurtz, the project scientist—NASA-speak for boss. "We leave those decisions to the pilots." Read the full TIME International cover story, and see the full photo essay, on TIME.com. Photograph by @pellegrinpaolo@magnumphotos for TIME

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It’s hard to wreck a continent you can barely get your hands on. Human beings typically do our worst environmental damage in the places we live and work—clear-cutting forests, strip-mining mountains. #Antarctica, however, was more or less out of reach. No more. @nasa has long employed satellites to monitor weather and climate from space; from 2003 to 2010, one that circled the Earth in a north-south orbit got no lower than 364 miles above ground. The most detailed work requires getting a lot closer. NASA’s IceBridge mission—an annual series of flights over both polar regions, surveying the state of the ice—fills that gap. Over the course of eight- to 12-hour expeditions, the flights maintain an average cruising altitude of just 1,500 ft.—and sometimes much lower. In November, during a nine-day expedition over the west Antarctic peninsula, photo­journalist @pellegrinpaolo rode along on the four-engine P-3B airplane that conducted the surveys. The images Pellegrin brought home are stark, scary, beautiful and otherworldly—almost literally. Read the full International cover story on TIME.com. Photograph by @pellegrinpaolo@magnumphotos for TIME #climatechange

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Defiant and confident, Olympic gymnast @alyraisman read a strong statement confronting Larry Nassar, who she says sexually abused her for years while she trained on the U.S. national team. "Larry, you do realize now that we, this group of women you so heartlessly abused over such a long period of time, are now a force and you are nothing. The tables have turned, Larry," the six-time Olympic medalist said in a Michigan courtroom on Jan. 19. "We have our voices, and we are not going anywhere." Raisman was one of dozens of women who have made victim impact statements at the sentencing hearing of Nassar, who pleaded guilty to multiple counts of first degree criminal sexual assault in state court. Raisman, who revealed she had been sexually abused by Nassar in November, has also been publicly critical of USA Gymnastics and the United States Olympic Committee for failing to protect gymnasts from Nassar: "They have been quick to capitalize on my success. But did they reach out when I came forward? No." Video source: CNN

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A drone dropped a flotation device to two teenagers caught in a riptide off the Australian coast on Jan. 18, in what is being heralded as a world-first rescue. Off the coast of Lennox Head, 470 miles north of Sydney, Monty Greenslade and Gabe Vidler were a little more than a half-mile (1 km.) from lifeguards who were about to start training with the drones—equipped with a camera, rescue gear and six rotors, the Associated Press reports. After a friend raised the alert, a lifeguard piloted the drone to the swimmers and dropped a rescue pod minutes faster than lifeguards could have reached the pair by conventional means. It was the first drone rescue since last month, when the New South Wales state government invested $345,000 in drone technology for rescue and shark-spotting work. Video source: Surf Life Saving NSW

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Street vendors sell merchandise related to Pope Francis' visit in Puerto Maldonado, Peru, on Jan. 18. In Peru, the second leg of his South American trip, @franciscus planned to meet with indigenous people and hear firsthand how the country's gold rush is destroying large areas of their Amazon homeland. Photograph by Ernesto Benavides—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

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The parents of 13 siblings who authorities said were held in captivity in their family’s Southern California home have been charged with committing years of torture and abuse that left their children malnourished, undersized and with cognitive impairments, Riverside County District Attorney Mike Hestrin said on Jan. 18. Prosecutors filed 12 counts of torture, seven counts of dependent adult abuse, six counts of child abuse and 12 counts of false imprisonment against the couple. David Turpin was additionally charged with one count of a lewd act on a child under age 14. The victims range in age from 2 to 29. Video source: CNN

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Protesters advocating for the DREAM Act hold a candlelight vigil outside the Capitol in Washington on Jan. 18. Congress continues to wrestle with funding the federal government as immigration has become a key stumbling block in negotiations to pass a continuing resolution. Photograph by Win McNamee—@gettyimages

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Photojournalists become celebrities by creating images that shape the way we see the world. Photo editors, away from the limelight, shape the way those images are presented. And Barbara Baker Burrows, who died of a rare brain disease on Jan. 10, at 73, chose the pictures that told some of the century’s biggest stories. After joining @LIFE's staff in 1966, Burrows—seen here in her Time & Life Building office in the mid-1980s—earned a reputation for never closing a story until it had exactly the right image, and for often finding it too. But her half-century at Time Inc. was distinguished by more than her encyclopedic knowledge of photography: she turned colleagues into family. "She was the mother of LIFE magazine—she cared for all the photographers," photographer Harry Benson told TIME after Burrows' death. "She remembered pictures that never made the final cut, which years later would take on a whole new meaning for a new story she was working on." Burrows once said she pinched herself sometimes, because working at LIFE felt like a dream. But that extended "family" knew that couldn’t be the case: her magic worked because there was, at its heart, something very real. Photograph by Tobey Sanford

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Mai Khanh Tran fled Saigon at age 9, worked through Harvard as a janitor and started her own pediatrics practice. The morning after the 2016 election that swept Donald Trump into office, she dragged herself out of bed and put on her white coat. One of her first patients of the day was a 4-year-old with a brain tumor whose mother, a nail-salon worker, could afford health insurance only because of the Affordable Care Act. "We cried together," Tran recalls. "And it dawned on me that we needed to get beyond the tears and speak up and fight." Now she’s running for Congress to replace Representative Ed Royce, a California Republican who recently announced his retirement. A year after millions marched in the streets, a record number of women are running for office. Read the full cover story on TIME.com. Photograph by @ilonaaszwarc for TIME

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Lauren Underwood, a registered nurse who worked as an adviser in the Obama Administration’s Department of Health and Human Services, decided to run for the House of Representatives in Illinois after her Congressman broke a pledge on the health care bill. Underwood, who has a heart condition, then went a step further. She encouraged a high school acquaintance, Anne Stava-Murray, to launch a bid for the Illinois house of representatives. Stava-Murray, a 32-year-old mother of two, had met 45-year-old Val Montgomery at the Women’s March in Naperville, Ill. They started a local Women’s March group together, and ultimately Stava-Murray persuaded Montgomery to run for a neighboring seat in the Illinois house. One woman’s campaign turned into three. "Women have been running Naperville forever, but we haven’t necessarily held elected office. Now we have this idea that we can lead," says Underwood. "It’s like this ripple effect." A year after millions marched in the streets, a record number of women are running for office. Read the full cover story on TIME.com. Photograph by @marzenaabrahamik for TIME

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TIME's new cover: First they marched. Now a record number of women are running for office. Photo-illustration by Sean McCabe for TIME. Photographs courtesy of the subjects or shot for TIME. Animation by @brobeldesign

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Students and faculty at Academia Bautista de Puerto Nuevo in San Juan, Puerto Rico, celebrated the return of electricity after 112 days without power. The school had been without electricity since Hurricane Maria roared across the American island territory of 3.4 million people on Sept. 20, 2017. At the time the video was captured, roughly 40 percent of the island remained without power. Video source: Academia Bautista de Puerto Nuevo

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During remarks on the Senate floor on Jan. 17, Republican Sen. Jeff Flake denounced President Trump’s use of the terms "fake news" and "enemy of the people" to describe the media and stories he doesn’t like. Flake, who is not seeking re-election in Arizona, accused Trump of using "despotic language" about the press, said he has "inspired dictators and authoritarians" and that Trump's attacks were reminiscent of words infamously used by Joseph Stalin. The White House responded by saying Flake was "looking for some attention." Video source: Senate TV

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One after one on Jan. 16, victims of disgraced former sports doctor Larry Nassar began speaking out in a Michigan courtroom about the sexual abuse and emotional trauma that he inflicted on them as children. Nearly 100 women and girls planned to speak or have their statements read during an extraordinary four-day sentencing hearing, the Associated Press reports. Many of them cried as they gave the initial testimonies on Tuesday. Nassar has pleaded guilty to molesting females with his hands at his Michigan State University office, his home and a Lansing-area gymnastics club. He also worked for Indianapolis-based USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians. "I testified to let the world know that you are a repulsive liar," one victim, Kyle Stephens, said to 54-year-old Nassar. Stephens, who was the first to speak, said Nassar repeatedly abused her from age 6 until age 12 during family visits to his home. She said Nassar later denied it, and her parents believed him. "Perhaps you have figured it out by now, but little girls don’t stay little forever," Stephens said. "They grow into strong women that … destroy your world." Video source: Pool

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A wallaby disrupted traffic by bounding across the Sydney Harbor Bridge on Jan. 16—with police in pursuit. Swamp wallabies, which are smaller marsupials than their kangaroo cousins, are common across eastern Australia, but are rarely seen in cities, the Associated Press reports. The wallaby hopped across the bridge’s eight lanes of traffic then turned onto an expressway toward the Sydney Opera House. The adult male was captured without any apparent serious injury and is expected to be released back into the wild within days. Video source: New South Wales Police

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Sen. Cory Booker sharply criticized Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen on Jan. 16 for saying she could not recall President Trump using the vulgarity "shithole" to describe African countries and Haiti during a closed-door meeting on immigration last week. Booker became emotional and visibly angered when Nielsen was taking questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee about Trump’s comments, the Associated Press reports. "When ignorance and bigotry are allied with power, it’s a dangerous force in our country," he said. "Your silence and your amnesia is complicity." Video source: Pool

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President Trump’s doctor recommended that the commander-in-chief should lose some weight, but said his "overall health is excellent." Speaking in the White House briefing room on Jan. 16, Dr. Ronny Jackson described the results of four hours of physical and mental health testing that occurred last Friday. On the President's mental health, he noted, "there’s no indication whatsoever that he has any cognitive issue.” Video source: White House

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Nearly 15,000 people have fled from villages around the Philippines’ most active volcano as lava flowed down Mount Mayon's crater, seen here in this timelapse footage, in a gentle eruption that scientists warned could turn explosive. The Associated Press reported on Jan. 15 that the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology increased the alert level to three, on a scale of five, indicating an increased prospect of a hazardous eruption "within weeks or even days." Video source: Ronald Chazzy Rebutica

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