SeaLegacy #TurningTheTide

We're on a mission to create healthy and abundant oceans. Founded by @PaulNicklen & @CristinaMittermeier.

http://sealegacy.org/tide

729 posts 856,881 followers 237 following

Photo by @DaisyGilardini // Midway Atoll - Hawaii
A Black-footed Albatross – listed as endangered species in the UICN red list - dead because the ingestion of too much plastic debris. The result of our civilized indiscriminate consumerism is a really sad reality for thousands of Albatross and endangered spices that live in the Archipelago. 30% of all albatross chicks die on Midway. While out at see feeding, the Albatross pick up all kind of plastic debris mistaking it for food. They will then feed their chick by regurgitating plastic in their stomachs with the result that they will be so full that will die for starvation and dehydration. It has been calculated that Albatross in Midway feed their chick with 5 TONS of plastic every year.
Be mindful when it comes to using plastic.
#Turningthetide #plastic #albatross

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Photo by @shawnheinrichs // Ultimately, conservation is about altering human behavior, as human behavior has become the primary driver of environmental decline.
We must ensure that the communities that depend on the oceans derive sustainable livelihoods and become the ambassadors and champions for conservation.
By uniting science with compassion and inspiration, we employ a more holistic approach to marine conservation, one that really considers the needs of local people,and seeks to engage communities in sustainable solutions that address their needs. #turningthetide with @shawnheinrichs @sea_legacy @bluespherefoundation #bluespherefoundation

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Video by @pacificwild // Thank you to everyone who emailed or tagged @johnhorgan4bc and the @bcndp to let them know you don’t want B.C.’s wolves persecuted, and thank you to @pacificwild for their leadership. Will the government extend the trapping season on Vancouver Island? This is a reminder to keep up the pressure in your own networks of friends and communities. If you haven’t done so already please email the premier at premier@gov.bc.ca and minister Doug Donald at FLNR.Minister@gov.bc.ca and voice your concern.
In the meantime, we will dig deeper and figure out how @sea_legacy and The Tide can make an even bigger impact. Onward! For the wolves. #turningthetide

Video edited by @lindsaymariestewart and shot by @iantmcallister

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Photo by @simonagerphotography // Incidental capture in fishing gear (also known as bycatch) is likely the greatest threat to sea turtles and many other species worldwide. Approximately 40% of all animals caught in fisheries are discarded as trash. Marine mammals, sea turtles, seabirds, and other species are caught and discarded, usually dead. For those animals that are caught and released injured but still alive, their fate after being released is unknown.

Trawls, longlines, driftnets, gillnets, pots, and traps are all responsible for the death of marine creatures by incidental capture or entanglement. #fishing #bycatch #turtles #commercialfishing #extinction #loggerhead #greenback #seashepherd #seashepherdglobal #seashepherdaustralia #turningthetide #sealegacy #tunafleet #vegan #tuna

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Photo by @DaisyGilardini // During the early spring male and female emperor penguins alternate between spending time with their chick and foraging at sea. At times the chicks are left alone in the colony. Often they gather in creches especially to keep warm during storms.
#Turningthetide #Antarctica #EmperorPenguin #penguin

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Photo by @PaulNicklen // It’s the final day to speak up for Vancouver Island’s wolves, who continue to endure barbaric trapping practices and short-sighted culls allowed by the @bcndp government. BC Premier @johnhorgan4bc now wants to extend the trapping season—still allowing leg hold traps—to 10 months of the year. You can send your comments directly to the Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations & Rural Development, Doug Donaldson: FLNR.Minister@gov.bc.ca. And also to Premier Horgan at Premier@Gov.bc.ca and john.horgan.mla@leg.bc.ca. Thank you for helping.

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Photo by @shawnheinrichs // Most of the world, except for ocean enthusiasts, have no clue what a manta ray is, let alone that it’s vulnerable. Unlike stingrays, mantas are not dangerous. Instead, they are highly social and gentle creatures. As trivial as it might seem, slight shifts in public perception can subconsciously affect efforts to save vulnerable species.

Manta rays (and their relatives the mobula rays) are under threat because targeted fishing programs around the world are harvesting them in unsustainable numbers. Instead of their meat, fisherman are usually after them for their gill rakers, which these animals use to collect food such as plankton. The gill rakers are in high demand in Chinese markets because they’re believed to cure a wide variety of ailments — from chickenpox and cancer. #turningthetide with @shawnheinrichs @bluespherefoundation @sea_legacy

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Photo by @PaulNicklen // The @BCNDP government is proposing to increase the wolf trapping season on Vancouver Island in a misguided attempt to preserve deer populations, lengthening the season to 10 months out of the year despite a lack of scientific evidence. The B.C. government is still not recognizing the coastal wolves of Vancouver Island as genetically distinct and globally rare, nor the highly social nature of these family groups or packs. Leg hold traps are inhumane, cruel and should be banned. If you want to help, join @sea_legacy and @pacificwild in letting the B.C. Fish and Wildlife Branch know you oppose the NDP government proposal to lengthen the wolf trapping season on Vancouver Island. Click the link in our bio for an online letter to send. The deadline is January 19th. Alternatively, the mailing address is: B.C. Fish and Wildlife Operations, 2080A Labieux Road, Nanaimo, V9T 6J9. Alternatively, you could call them at (250) 751-3100 or email @johnhorgan4bc directly at premier@gov.bc.ca.
#turningthetide

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Photo by @simonagerphotography // The true cost of your sushi roll. Victims of the tuna industry, a vessel encircled a school of tuna, also trapping 128 sharks. Unceremoniously strung up by the tail and discarded dead and dying back to the ocean. Bycatch is the capture of non-target fish and ocean wildlife, including what is brought to port and what is discarded at sea, dead or dying. Bycatch is one of the biggest threats to the oceans and has contributed to over fishing and the dramatic decline of fish populations around the world. Commercial fisheries bring in approximately 160 billion pounds of marine catch around the world each year. Recent estimates indicate as much as 40 percent of global catch is discarded overboard. Anything can be bycatch: the dolphins, sharks, whales, that are encircled to bring you canned tuna and sushi, the sea turtles caught to bring you shrimp, the flounder thrown overboard to put seared scallops on the menu, the endangered whales migrating thousands of miles only to become entangled for the sake of lobster bisque, and the millions of pounds of halibut or cod that are wasted when fishermen have already reached their quota. Much of this captured wildlife is treated as waste, thrown overboard dead or dying. This conservation problem must be solved to ensure healthy oceans into the future. #bycatch #sealegacy #turningthetide #seashepherd #unsustainable #overfishing #tuna #sushi #vegan #fishing #photooftheday #parleyfortheoceans

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Photo by @simonagerphotography // A Chinese longliner crew hooks a highly endangered Yellowfin tuna. How fish are caught also affects their sustainability. Longlining can be especially devastating because it involves one line that can have 3,000 baited hooks and stretch for up to 50 miles (80.5 kilometers). The hooks dangle at a depth between 328 feet (100 meters) and 492 feet (150 meters), where the largest tuna—such as the threatened bluefin—tend to swim. The hooks also catch more than 80 kinds of nontargeted creatures, including endangered sea turtles, which often die on the line before the fishing vessel reels in the catch. #sushi #longliner #tuna #sealegacy #turningthetide #endangered #yellowfintuna #vegan #seashepherd #deadoceans #gabon #overfishing #extinct #seashepherdglobal

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Photo by @IantMcAllister // The @BCNDP government is proposing to increase the wolf trapping season on Vancouver Island in a misguided attempt to preserve deer populations, lengthening the season to 10 months out of the year despite a lack of scientific evidence. The B.C. government is still not recognizing the coastal wolves of Vancouver Island as genetically distinct and globally rare, nor the highly social nature of these family groups or packs. Leg hold traps are inhumane, cruel and should be banned. If you want to help, join @sea_legacy and @pacificwild in letting the B.C. Fish and Wildlife Branch know you oppose the NDP government proposal to lengthen the wolf trapping season on Vancouver Island. Click the link in our bio for an online letter to send. The deadline is January 19th. Alternatively, the mailing address is: B.C. Fish and Wildlife Operations, 2080A Labieux Road, Nanaimo, V9T 6J9. Alternatively, you could call them at (250) 751-3100. #turningthetide

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Photo by @DaisyGilardini // The Great Bear Rainforest on Canada’s West Coast is the home of the elusive Kermode or Spirit Bear, a subspecies of the American black bear that, due to a recessive gene, has a white or cream-coloured fur that makes it unique.
At low tide, the bears stick close to the coastal tideline, where mussels and barnacles are to be found on rocks and dead trees are exposed to the elements.
Kermode bears love snacking on shellfish, to the bear, it’s a little like snacking on crunchy potato chips during Happy Hour.
#TurningTheTide #SpiritBear #GreatBearRainforest #explorecanada #Kermodebear

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Photo by @shawnheinrichs // The Gardens of the Queen (‘Jardines de la Reina’ in Spanish) is possibly one of the last relatively intact reef habitats in all the Caribbean. Whereas most of the reefs in the region have been severely overfished and/or destroyed, this area hosts and astonishing abundance and diversity of corals and marine life. Spanning 840 square miles of islands, reefs and mangroves, this remote archipelago located 60 miles to south of the main island of Cuba, has been a strictly protected marine reserve since 1996. And the results of this bold conservation effort are staggering.
In the mangroves and sea grasses, American crocodiles lie motionless, with only their eyes breaking the calm surface. Sometimes they’ll come in for a close encounter to check you out! #turningthetide with @shawnheinrichs @sea_legacy

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Photo by @cristinamittermeier // In a massive win for the orcas, fisheries, and people of Norway, the Lofoten region has been protected from oil and gas exploration. SeaLegacy ran a massive campaign during the presidential election and urged both candidates not to open the region to invasive petroleum industries until “at least 2021.” While the fight is far from over, we are proud to announce the pressure @sea_legacy and the Norwegian public applied has resulted in further protection. This is how conservation works. This is what results look like. Thank you to all of our supporters and to Norwegian prime minister @erna_solberg.

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Photo by @PaulNicklen // $16,000 of hardware waiting for one of nature’s most majestic apex predators to walk by. If camera tripods and long lenses were the only infrastructure impeding on the Arctic and its animals, we’d be happy.

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Photo by @DaisyGilardini // Polar bears’ reproductive rate is among the lowest of all mammals. Females reach maturity at the age of four- to five-years-old and usually give birth to two cubs.
Mortality is high during the cubs’ first year of life, and depends largely on the mother’s health. Cubs will stay with their mother for two and a half to three years.
Bears can live anywhere from 20 to 30 years. That means a typical female will have five or six litters during her lifetime, of which two in three cubs will die within their first two years.
With such a slow-to-reproduce animal, bad polar bear management could have dramatic consequences on their numbers.
Mother bears and their cubs generally emerge from their dens in March or April, when the cubs are strong enough to survive outdoors and are ready to make the trek to the ice. This period also coincides with the seals’ birthing season on the pack ice — easy meals for the mother bears who have been fasting for as long as eight months at this point. #TurningTheTide #WapuskNationalPark #PolarBear #explorecanada

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Photo by @PaulNicklen // Steller’s sea lions sharing sea stars in the Salish Sea. It’s not a tongue-twister. It’s an experience not to be missed for Pacific Northwest divers. These playful pinnipeds should be approached with caution and given due respect, like any wild animal.

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Photo by @PaulNicklen // The dramatic skyline of a jagged mountain range towers above a beautiful Svalbard scene. We watched this big, healthy polar bear wandering through ultralight, cold powder snow. It was like a scene out of Narnia. #turningthetide with @sea_legacy and @paulnicklen.

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Photo by @shawnheinrichs // We slid quietly off the side of the boat and finned into the blue. Suddenly the water directly in front of us erupted as several whales broke the surface and blew a dense cloud of mist into the air. And then we were face-to-face with this stampede of behemoths, 15 adult whales weighing 500 tons in total - like diving head-first into a herd of charging dinosaurs! The ocean shook as they passed below and on both sides, their massive pectoral fins carefully navigating around us and their powerful tails turning the sea into a frothing cauldron of blue and bubbles. And then, as quickly as they appeared, they were gone, 14 males in hot pursuit of a single female. But, even these words barely do justice to the incredible power and magnificence of the humpback whales. 🐳🔥🐳💥#TurningTheTide

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Photo by @DaisyGilardini // Emperor penguins are unique among penguins. For one, their breeding cycle is unlike any other species of penguin.
Their breeding season begins in the Southern autumn (April), when the sea ice is strong enough for the colony to assemble. Emperor penguins are monogamous: They mate for life, and look for the same partner, year after year. They recognize each other by their calls, when they re-join the colony. Once the family is reunited, they greet each other with ritual bowing.
When the female lays her egg she passes it to her mate and leaves to feed on her own. She will remain at sea, foraging for food, until spring.
During those early winter months, the male incubates the egg by perching it on top of his feet, under a warm blanket of folding skin, much like a close-fitting fleece jacket, even as outside temperatures drop as low as -35C.
The female will return in July, often to find a newly hatched chick. The male then hands over the chick and himself leaves, to feed at sea. The male will periodically return with food during this time, to help raise the chick. Male and female alternate between spending time with their chick and foraging at sea.
#Turningthetide #Antarctica #EmperorPenguin #penguin

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Photo by @shawnheinrichs // My love of the oceans fuels me and I am captivated by the grace and beauty of the marine life within it. I believe that people only protect what they love and so I am on a mission to capture inspiring and dramatic imagery that connects the global community to the beauty and vulnerability of threatened marine species. Through this connection, I hope the world will ultimately share my passion for these creatures and be inspired to act before it is too late.

Contrary to its name, the whale shark is not a whale; it is, rather, the world’s largest fish, growing as long as 60 feet. Despite its massive size, whale sharks are the “gentle giants” of the ocean. Unlike their other shark relatives that are meat-eaters, these giants are filter feeders. Because of its size, slowness, long development time, and high value on international markets, the species is inherently vulnerable to intentional fishing and the illegal wildlife trade. Incidental entanglement is also a threat. #TurningTheTide #WhaleShark #SaveSharks

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Photo by @cristinamittermeier // On February 8th, SeaLegacy’s co-founders will be in #Chicago for a fundraiser at @MarshallsLanding. Join us for an evening of inspiring art and conversation about conservation. Go here for tickets and information: @lookbelowthesurface www.LookBelowTheSurface.org

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Photo by @Andy_Mann // Writer @CraigWelch is doing incredible work with @NatGeo in regards to sea turtle populations. Unfortunately, the news is not good: “…the sex of a sea turtle is determined by the heat of sand incubating their eggs, scientists suspected they might see slightly more females. Climate change, after all, has driven air and sea temperatures higher, which, in these creatures, favors female offspring. But instead, they found female sea turtles from the Pacific Ocean's largest and most important green sea turtle rookery now outnumber males by at least 116 to 1.” Please click the link in our bio to read the alarming new story.

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Photo by @DaisyGilardini // I love photographing in Antarctica early in the summer, when sunsets turn into sunrises and you can stay up the all night photographing the changing light on the sea ice and icebergs.
It was early in the morning on this expedition— 3 am — when we celebrated crossing the Antarctic Circle. An already magical moment became even more magical with the sudden appearance of an albatross.
Let’s work together to create the largest protected area on Earth: an Antarctic Ocean Sanctuary.
#Turningthetide #climatechange #iceberg

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Photo by @andy_mann // An American #alligator hunkers down in the murky, nutrient rich waters of the Florida #Everglades. This ancient species is under threat as sea levels rise and brackish waters move further North into its territory. Unable to secrete salt like crocodiles, alligators cannot tolerate seawater and must relocate. // please #followme @andy_mann as I continue to explore the #underwater ecosystems of the Everglades, one of my favorite watersheds in the world. @ladzinski

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Photo by @cristinamittermeier // When winter arrives, the Steller’s sea lions of the Salish Sea congregate on isolated islands and rocks. Loud, large and boisterous, these curious animals are somewhat awkward out of the water but move like liquid dancers once they dive in. They also like to get up close and personal with divers.

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Photo by @DaisyGilardini // The best time to observe the elusive Kermode bear is in September, during the salmon run. At this time of year, bears gather along the river banks to gorge themselves on fish in order to build up the reserves necessary for winter hibernation.
They are particularly keen on salmon roe. Towards the end of the season, if they catch a male salmon, they won’t even bite — they just let it go. In this particular moment, the bear bit down firmly on a salmon, squeezing out the roe in a powerful spurt. It happened so quickly, I didn’t see it happen at the time. Later that evening, while reviewing my images, I was pleasantly surprised to find such a great action shot!
Great Bear Rainforest - British Columbia - Canada
#TurningTheTide #SpiritBear #GreatBearRainforest #explorecanada #Kermodebear

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Video by @paulnicklen // Not far from the @sea_legacy HQ, the Salish Sea teems with life. In 2018, we are ratcheting up the conservation work in our own backyard. There are over 3000 species in this body of water, and eight million people living on its Pacific Northwest shores. It’s time to put protections in place. #turningthetide

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Photo by @jodymacdonaldphoto // We came across a feeding station and tracked the tides to try to figure out when the mantas rays would come and feed. After a few days we figured out their feeding schedule and would swim with these docile giants as often as we could. It was like watching a beautiful dance that was performed just for us. Mantas it turns out have huge brains — the biggest of any fish — with especially developed areas for learning, problem solving and communicating. The giant rays are playful, curious and might even recognize themselves in mirrors, a sign of self-awareness. A manta’s brain can be ten times larger than a whale shark’s. Not only is the brain physically big, it’s also large relative to the ray’s body. That’s a sign that they are intelligent, true of elephants, dolphins and people. Maybe they were putting on a performance just for us after all;) #turningthetide

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Photo by @cristinamittermeier // A whale shark swims lazily through the blue waters of Baja California, Mexico. The largest specimen recorded reportedly weighed 47,000 lbs. Beautiful, peaceful and slow-moving, these filter-feeding sharks are the largest known fish in our oceans.

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